Category Archives: district attorney

Get informed for Sept. 4 primary for district attorney

The Sept. 4, 2018 primary will likely determine the next Middlesex and Suffolk District Attorneys.  District attorneys have a HUGE role in influencing who gets prosecuted for what, and the punishment. Unfortunately, the district attorney’s role is often under the radar.
The Middlesex and Suffolk County district attorneys will likely be determined on the Sept. 4, 2018 primary.
Some 400 people attended the Middlesex County District Attorney and District 3 Governor’s Council debate July 24. Watch Arlington cable TV’s excellent recording of the Middlesex debate here.

The Suffolk County debate for District Attorney can be seen on Facebook

HELP spread the word about the opportunity we have on Sept. 4 to influence who gets prosecuted for what crimes in Middlesex and Suffolk counties.
You could invite friends to a group viewing in your home to watch the debate together and talk about it.
Ask if your local municipal television station is carrying the debate, and if not ask them to do so.
You could team up with a group to host a public viewing and discussion.  Please share a link to this post to educate people.
Anything you do will be appreciated.
Both Middlesex County candidates are Democrats, so the primary election will be decisive.  Five of the six candidates in Suffolk County are Democrats, and whoever wins the primary will go on to face an independent challenger in November. There are no Republicans are in this race.
The eight members of the Governor’s Council race is another “under the radar” way to influence the public process. They approve the Governor’s commutations and pardons, and nominations to judges, clerk-magistrates, public administrators, members of the parole board and more.
THANKS for caring and taking action of any size, including forwarding this post to friends and activists to encourage them to VOTE on Sept. 4.
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Omnibus Bill in limbo until 5/25

The good news is that we have a significant bill to reform the Massachusetts justice andMassachusetts statehouse and state legislators have passed dozens of bills to fill our prisons and jails. These bills often discriminate on the basis of race, ethnicity, income, social class, education, mental health and drug and substance addiction and abuse

corrections systems. The bad news is that legislators are afraid of political repercussions of being smart on crime instead of tough on crime, out-dated practices that delivered us a racist system of mass incarceration.

The buzz on Beacon Hill is that because crime and punishment are hot buttons, many state legislators want to avoid antagonizing a constituent into running against her or him.
Hence, we expect NO ACTION will be taken to bring the Omnibus Bill out of conference committee until AFTER May 25, the last day candidates can file to run for state office in Massachusetts on the ballot. [Write-ins are always possible.]
The conference committee is struggling to resolve Mandatory Minimums. Most district attorneys use the possibility of a mandatory minimum sentence in drug cases to threaten and intimidate someone into pleading guilty to a lesser charge and shorter sentence.
With the power granted by mandatory minimums, District Attorneys are empowered to act as prosecutor, judge and jury, at their discretion, only answering to voters. In the voting booth, a typical voter doesn’t realize the power of a district attorney, and they often run unopposed.
Some legislators and grieving parents mistakenly believe that mandatory minimum sentencing for drug offenses will end the war on drugs, and eliminate drug dealers. This is false. Mandatory minimums have NOT ended the drug war, just filled up our prisons and jails. Drugs are still available to buyers and addicts.
What a difference a District Attorney Makes
EMIT and the ACLU of Massachusetts have partnered on the project What A Difference A DA Makes.   Educational events to raise awareness of this campaign have already been happening, including in Arlington, Mass. If you would like to host an event on What a Difference A DA Makes,  contact emit.susan@gmail.com.
​Continuing Education and Networking opportunities
To learn more about reforming our justice and corrections systems, the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice at the Harvard Law School, regularly sponsors FREE speakers, films and forums.
Sign up to their mailing list here: houstoninst@law.harvard.edu