Category Archives: jails

Help restore more visiting hours at Gardner Prison

The visiting hours at Gardner State Prison have been cut to only Friday and half-time on Saturday and Sunday. This creates a hardship for many people because of their work schedules and/or the long travel distances to get to the prison.

Please join us in objecting to the policy by signing this petition:

http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/do-not-reduce-family-visitation-schedule-at-ncci

Please join our protest by calling your elected representative to the Governor’s Council to demand additional days of visiting hours.  Find your rep here.

http://www.mass.gov/portal/government/govs-council.html

Other medium-security prisons in Massachusetts have 29 to 39 hours available to visit, Gardner has just 14 hours a week on three days since March 27. Families are very upset because many people who work weekends can now visit on Friday evening.

Because only two adults are allowed to visit at a time, many families will not be able to spread out visits with the new limitations. Other problems include limited visitor parking, a small waiting area that only holds at most 30 people, and an equally small visiting room. Such over-crowding may cause some people to be turned away and unable to visit.

The families of the incarcerated men believe this limited visitation schedule alienates the families and harms children who need to see their father more than once a week. Severely limiting visiting hours does not promote the re-unification of families, and has caused great upset among the men who are incarcerated at Gardner.

Curtailing visitation is not in the spirit of justice and corrections systems reform. Many studies of incarceration and re-entry show evidence that maintaining strong family connections during incarceration leads to lower rates of recidivism and more positive dynamics within a correctional institution. THANK YOU for signing the petition and calling your governor’s council representative.

Visiting schedule for Gardner State Prison

Friday                   1-8:30 pm [Open two periods]

Saturday              9 am to noon      Last names beginning with A-L

12-3:30 PM         Last names beginning with M-Z

Sunday                 9 am to noon      M-Z

12-3:30 pm         A-L

Monday-Thursday            No visiting hours for general population.

Sen. Karen Spilka: Why a New Women’s Jail?

Four members of EMIT- End Mass Incarceration Together, a task force of UU Mass Action Network,

Sen KAren Spilka is a champion of the underserved.

State Senator Karen Spilka, D-Ashland, chairwoman of the Senate Ways and Means Committee.

met with Sen. Spilka’s aide, Aaron Carty Legislative Counsel [Aaron.Carty@masenate.gov], to learn more about why Sen. Spilka proposed An act establishing an eastern Massachusetts women’s county corrections facility.

“It is not the intention to build a new jail, but to open the conversation,” said Carty. “She is not married to anything. She is listening to what others think,” he added.

Sen. Spilka has a history of diverting people from the criminal justice system, including efforts in juvenile justice reform. In the 2013-2014 legislative session, Sen. Spilka sponsored legislation that raised the juvenile age minimum from 17 to 18 and legislation that prohibited the shackling of pregnant women in Massachusetts jails, according to Carty.

Women detainees have special needs and 40 percent of the people at Framingham MCI are there on a pre-trial basis, people who are often marginalized. The bill is intended to be a conversation starter to solve the problem, Carty explained. “She is totally open to other solutions,” he said.

Bill Gardner, an EMIT member from Arlington, proposed a community meeting in her district of Framingham, in which the senator could meet with community members and activists to explain her position and motivation for introducing the bill.

Her main goal behind the bill is how to best serve pre-trial detainees at Framingham MCI and jails across the state. Senator Spilka plans to address the intent of the bill when it comes before a committee hearing later this legislative session. In addition, the public is encouraged to express concerns and comments by testifying or submitting written testimony at all committee hearings.