Category Archives: restorative justice

How to take small actions to make a big push for justice for all in Massachusetts

CourtWatch Data Entry Party – Volunteers Needed! 
When: Sun Oct 21, 2:00 – 5:00 PM
When:  Harvard Law, Austin Hall 111 West, Cambridge

Volunteers are needed for data entry.  The qualitative data from court watch needs to be entered into the database.  Volunteers are asked to bring their laptop to this event
More Info, Contact CourtWatch MA at mailto:info@courtwatchma.org

RSVP HERE

  
Worcester and Plymouth County are the focus of the general election in November

Worcester:         Joe Early (D, Incumbent) and Blake Rubin (unenrolled)
Click to learn more about these candidates

Plymouth:          Timothy Cruz (R, Incumbent) and John Bradley (D)
Click to learn more about these candidates

Suffolk:                Rachel Rollins (D) and Michael Mahoney (I)
Click to learn more about these candidates


Plymouth County:  Pre-Election Canvass and Training
When: Sat Nov 3, 11:00 – 3:30 PM
Where: Brockton, location TBD  (will be in downtown area)

Join the #DADifference canvass team for a brief training before you head out to provide info about the election and encourage people to vote.  We need a big turnout for this event! You’ll be paired with a partner – it’s no problem if you’re not from the area.

More Info    RSVP HERE


Worcester County: Public Education Forum
When: Tue Oct 16, 5:30 – 7:00 PM
Where: YWCA, 1 Salem St., Worcester
Co-Sponsors: ACLU MA, ACLU Smart Justice and #DADifference

Learn about the impact district attorneys have on your community and why it is important to participate in the Worcester County District Attorney election on November 6. It’s time to use our voices – and our vote – to make our criminal legal system fairer for everyone.   FLYER


Worcester County: DA Candidate Debate
When: Mon Oct 22, 6:00 – 8:00 PM
Where: Worcester State University, 486 Chandler St., Worcester
Co-Sponsors:  League of Women Voters, NAACP and MA Women of Color Coalition and
#DADifference

Hear from candidates Joe Early (D)  and Blake Rubin (I)
Find more info HERE


Pre-Election Canvass & Training
When: Sat Oct 27, 11:00 – 3:30 PM
Where: Stone Soup, 4 King St., Worcester
Register HERE     More Info

Join the #DADifference canvass team for a brief training before you head out to provide info about the election and encourage people to vote.  We need a big turnout for this event! You’ll be paired with a partner – it’s no problem if you’re not from the area.

THANKS to Laura Wagner, EMIT core co-founder and director of Unitarian Universalist Mass Action, for writing up these opportunities.
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Restorative Justice training opportunities

Volunteers are needed to participate in the restorative justice system, to keep offenders from serving prison time, and create opportunities to make restitution with the victims of their crime.

C4RJ, Communities for Restorative Justice, in Middlesex County, is directed by Erin Freeborn.  Arlington Police Chief Fred Ryan is a primary advocate and practitioner of restorative justice. Learn more from these experts at the following events and websites.

1. Arlington Human Rights Commission’s “Understanding Restorative Justice” event with Arlington’s Police Chief Fred Ryan and Erin Freeborn, the Executive Director of Communities for Restorative Justice (C4RJ), on Saturday, October 13, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Arlington Senior Center (27 Maple Street).  Here’s the Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/296326214528836/.

C4RJ led the restorative justice process with the individual who defaced my congregation’s Black Lives Matter banner and, more recently, with 14 youths who covered the Arlington High School with offensive graffiti.  Last year they handled cases from 17 different communities and put out a new “Restorative Practices Guide for Schools” (www.c4rj.org).

2. The Center for Restorative Justice at Suffolk University is offering three training events for people who want to use restorative practices professionally.  These events are limited to 25 people each, and preregistration is required, and there are a few vacancies in each:

Tier 1:  Circle Training and Introduction to Restorative Practices for Educators (Oct. 19-20):  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/tier-1-circle-training-and-introduction-to-restorative-practices-for-educators-tickets-49706640901

Tier 2:  Restorative Mindset and Restorative Classroom Management (Nov. 16-17):  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/tier-2-restorative-mindset-and-restorative-classroom-management-tickets-49707875594

Tier 3:  Restorative Conferencing for Discipline (Dec. 7-8):  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/tier-3-restorative-conferencing-for-discipline-tickets-49708258740

Restorative justice focuses on helping people understand the harm they have done, take responsibility for their actions, and help meet the needs identified by the people they have hurt.  It is important for reducing mass incarceration and the number of people who are burdened with a criminal record, and a helpful approach to school discipline to avoid the school-to-prison pipeline.

Restorative justice often has much better outcomes for everyone than more punitive approaches.  It has a high satisfaction rate among participants (98 percent in C4RJ’s circles last year), but when something happens, people are unlikely to choose restorative justice unless they’ve heard about it already.

Please attend on Oct. 13 for a general introduction to restorative justice, and share these invitations with anyone who might be in a position to use restorative justice in their life or work.

–Lori Kenshaft, EMIT Core member, leader of End Mass Incarceration Working Group of First Parish Unitarian Universalist in Arlington. 

A cop explains restorative justice

Restorative justice is a way to prevent people from entering the prison and court systems, and eliminates creating young felons. A short stint of 24-48 hours in jail can change the trajectory of a life FOREVER. More than a dozen communities in Massachusetts have voluntarily signed up for this diversion program. See more here.

Restorative justice is an equitable way for the people, property owners and families of those who are impacted and perpetuated a crime to sit together in a circle, and talk about what happened.

State Senator Jamie Eldridge [D-Acton] has sponsored legislation to introduce restorative justice to every community in Massachusetts.  The bill has been introduced in several sessions and has failed to gain endorsement at the State House. Most people don’t understand what it is and how it works.

Restorative justice allows people to take responsiblity for what they did, and for all parties to understand the impact on victims, perpetuators and property owners. The process reduces the rate of recidivism and keeps people out of jail and prison.

Next steps toward reforming the Mass. justice system

THANKS TO YOU, regular voters who care, EMIT and UU Mass Action Network, delivered 700-plus

Massachusetts statehouse and state legislators have passed dozens of bills to fill our prisons and  jails. These bills often discriminate on the basis of race, ethnicity, income, social class, education, mental health and drug and substance addiction and abuse

The Statehouse is where we need to encourage lawmakers to pass a series of bills over a number of years to untangle the injustice of mass incarceration in Massachusetts.

letters to state lawmakers in January 2015 asking them to cosponsor criminal justice reform, especially to end mandatory minimum sentencing for low-level drug offenses and to reform pre-trial practices — what happens when someone gets arrested, and on what basis do we decide to incarcerate them, without being found guilty.

Reaching out to state lawmakers, especially representatives in face-to-face meetings, is one of the most effective ways to make our voice heard in future laws. This is the goal of EMIT.

We especially need voters to visit with state representatives in Springfield, New Bedford and Fall River, Plymouth-Cape Cod-The Islands, and Cape Ann/The North Shore. Can you join us? Please email emit.susan at g mail dot com. Our strategy is simple and issues can easily be understood and communicated to state legislators.

Thanks to the leadership of the State Senate President Stan Rosenberg, D-Amherst, the 40 members of the State Senate may be on board with criminal justice reform this legislative session. In 2015, we must focus on the 160 state representatives, and meet with them personally, in their home districts, with constituents like you and a few friends. You can meet at the public library or town hall for 30 minutes and share your urgency to end mass incarceration now.

EMIT is also co-sponsoring events to inform to reform so people feel more knowledgeable when meeting with state representatives.

Save March 28 in Amherst, 10 am to 2 pm at the UCC Church, 165 Main St. Featured speakers are Sen. Stan Rosenberg, who will give more details on justice reinvestment and State Sen. Jamie Eldridge who will describe some pending criminal justice reform bills. Formerly incarcerated people will share their stories, and participants will have time to network. Sponsored by EMIT and Social Justice Committee of Amherst UCC.

Save March 12 in New Bedford and April 16 in Springfield for additional events. More info to come.

In Arlington, on Saturday, March 14, 1-4:30 pm, attend a Road Map towards Justice: How to End Mass Incarceration in Massachusetts, at First Parish Unitarian Universalist 630 Massachusetts Avenue in Arlington.

Come learn about the bills related to mass incarceration and prison reform that might become law in the next two years, and how you can help make our criminal justice system more fair and effective.  You will hear from experts, receive fact sheets, and have time to connect with others and digest what you are learning.  Speakers include Rep. Dave Rogers, Rep. Sean Garballey, Barbara Dougan, Andrea James, Jon Tetherly, and EPOCA members.  Refreshments served too!

RSVPs to end-mass-incarceration@firstparish.info are appreciated but not required.

This interactive workshop is organized by the Mass Incarceration Working Group of First Parish Arlington and co-sponsored by the Criminal Justice Policy Coalition, End Mass Incarceration Together, EPOCA (Ex-Prisoners and Prisoners Organizing for Community Advancement), Families Against Mandatory Minimums, and the Mystic Valley Branch of the NAACP,