Tag Archives: justice reform

Omnibus Bill in limbo until 5/25

The good news is that we have a significant bill to reform the Massachusetts justice andMassachusetts statehouse and state legislators have passed dozens of bills to fill our prisons and jails. These bills often discriminate on the basis of race, ethnicity, income, social class, education, mental health and drug and substance addiction and abuse

corrections systems. The bad news is that legislators are afraid of political repercussions of being smart on crime instead of tough on crime, out-dated practices that delivered us a racist system of mass incarceration.

The buzz on Beacon Hill is that because crime and punishment are hot buttons, many state legislators want to avoid antagonizing a constituent into running against her or him.
Hence, we expect NO ACTION will be taken to bring the Omnibus Bill out of conference committee until AFTER May 25, the last day candidates can file to run for state office in Massachusetts on the ballot. [Write-ins are always possible.]
The conference committee is struggling to resolve Mandatory Minimums. Most district attorneys use the possibility of a mandatory minimum sentence in drug cases to threaten and intimidate someone into pleading guilty to a lesser charge and shorter sentence.
With the power granted by mandatory minimums, District Attorneys are empowered to act as prosecutor, judge and jury, at their discretion, only answering to voters. In the voting booth, a typical voter doesn’t realize the power of a district attorney, and they often run unopposed.
Some legislators and grieving parents mistakenly believe that mandatory minimum sentencing for drug offenses will end the war on drugs, and eliminate drug dealers. This is false. Mandatory minimums have NOT ended the drug war, just filled up our prisons and jails. Drugs are still available to buyers and addicts.
What a difference a District Attorney Makes
EMIT and the ACLU of Massachusetts have partnered on the project What A Difference A DA Makes.   Educational events to raise awareness of this campaign have already been happening, including in Arlington, Mass. If you would like to host an event on What a Difference A DA Makes,  contact emit.susan@gmail.com.
​Continuing Education and Networking opportunities
To learn more about reforming our justice and corrections systems, the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice at the Harvard Law School, regularly sponsors FREE speakers, films and forums.
Sign up to their mailing list here: houstoninst@law.harvard.edu 
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The conference committee for the Massachusetts Act to Reform Criminal Justice was appointed today, Nov. 28, 2017.
Senate
Will Brownsberger (D-Belmont/Cambridge), Senate Co-Chair of the Joint Judiciary Committee, and a principal author of the Senate version of the bill.
Cynthia Creem (D-Brookline/Newton), a member of the Judiciary Committee
Bruce Tarr (R-Gloucester), Senate Minority Leader
House
Claire Cronin (D-Brockton), House Co-Chair of the Joint Judiciary Committee, and a principal author of the Senate version of the bill.
Ronald Mariano (D-Qunicy)
Sheila Harrington (R-Groton), a member of the Judiciary Committee
The House engrossed bill (new number, House 4043) is out:
The bi-partisan group will work out comprimses between the House and Senate version of the monumental Act to Reform Criminal Justice.

Add your voice to this letter

The “Big 4” Gov. Baker, Chief Justice Gants, Senate Pres. Rosenberg and House Speaker DeLeo received a 9-page letter from the Coalition for Effective Public Safety on justice reform for the 2017-18 legislative session, signed by 70-plus advocacy groups.
 
 
The deadline is Feb. 14, 2017. Sign today, add your comments and ask friends to join in this simple action. Post it on Facebook, and forward the invitation to your networks. CLICK HERE to sign.
Below are links to the one-page summary and the 9 page letter. This is a huge statewide effort. Please join us. THANK YOU.